• German Reunification in Feature Films: Der Turm (2012)

German Reunification in Feature Films: Der Turm (2012)

  • 20 Oct 2015
  • 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM
  • University of St Thomas, St Paul, MN, OEC #203
German Reunification in Feature FIlms: 
Der Turm
(Germany 2012; German with English subtitles)

Tuesday, October 20, 7pm
University of St Thomas, St Paul, MN, OEC #203
Free and open to the public


A family saga set during the final years of the GDR. Surgeon Richard Hoffmann may have come to an opportunistic arrangement with the system a long time ago, but his way of life enables state security officials to blackmail him. Richard’s son Christian manages to pass his final secondary school exams despite a number of conflicts and goes through a tough and eventful time after joining the National People’s Army. His uncle Meno is an editor and struggles, at times only half-heartedly, against the parameters set by state censorship. The fall of the Wall in November 1989 seems to be felt as a salvation by the protagonists. The adaptation of Uwe Tellkamp’s novel of the same name does away with the epic scope of the written original, but was considered one of the best things to come out of German TV in 2012. Full synopsis.

Sponsored by the German program at the University of St. Thomas, the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany, Washington, DC, and the Germanic-American Institute.  This event is part of the 25 Years of German Unity Campus Campaign, which includes a film series, lectures, and more. 

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Click for St. Thomas campus map. Parking is available on the street or in the garage at Cretin & Grand Avenues.

 

History is full of assassinated leaders, but also full of near misses. Join us with Dr. Susanne Wagner, German Program Director at the University of St. Thomas, for a discussion focusing on the different types of Widerstand (resistance) and some of the more prominent resistance groups, such as the men involved in the July 20, 1944 failed attempt to assassinate Hitler, the Kreisauer Kreis (Kreisau Circle), the Rote Kapelle (the Red Orchestra), and the Weiße Rose (White Rose). What were the motivations of Widerstand fighters with Colonel Claus Graf von Stauffenberg, who planted the bomb that missed its mark? How do we evaluate Einsame Kämpfer (lonely fighters) such as Jägerstätter and George Elser, or the passive resistance of the members of the Weiße Rose and the Kreisauer Kreis?  Are the Swing Kids really Widerstand? The more extreme a regime, the more consequent the resistance against it! 

 

Wagner is a cultural and literary historian focusing on 19th-/20th century Germany with a research emphasis on resistance literature. In addition to heading the German Program at the University of St. Thomas, she is also a member of the Executive Council of the American Council of Teachers of German (AATG).

 

History is full of assassinated leaders, but also full of near misses. Join us with Dr. Susanne Wagner, German Program Director at the University of St. Thomas, for a discussion focusing on the different types of Widerstand (resistance) and some of the more prominent resistance groups, such as the men involved in the July 20, 1944 failed attempt to assassinate Hitler, the Kreisauer Kreis (Kreisau Circle), the Rote Kapelle (the Red Orchestra), and the Weiße Rose (White Rose). What were the motivations of Widerstand fighters with Colonel Claus Graf von Stauffenberg, who planted the bomb that missed its mark? How do we evaluate Einsame Kämpfer (lonely fighters) such as Jägerstätter and George Elser, or the passive resistance of the members of the Weiße Rose and the Kreisauer Kreis?  Are the Swing Kids really Widerstand? The more extreme a regime, the more consequent the resistance against it! 

 

Wagner is a cultural and literary historian focusing on 19th-/20th century Germany with a research emphasis on resistance literature. In addition to heading the German Program at the University of St. Thomas, she is also a member of the Executive Council of the American Council of Teachers of German (AATG).

 

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