• GermanFest Minnesota

GermanFest Minnesota

  • 19 Jun 2015
  • 4:00 PM
  • 21 Jun 2015
  • 5:00 PM
  • Historic Schmidt Brewery on 7th Street in St. Paul
GermanFest Minnesota

June 19-21, 2015
at the Historic Schmidt Brewery in St. Paul
Free admission and parking

GermanFest logo

The Fort Road Federation is partnering with FILO Productions to produce a new ethnic festival. The event, titled GermanFest, strives to be the premier German cultural event in the Midwest. This three day event on June 19-21, 2015, at the historic Schmidt Brewery, features the many aspects that make up German culture — far beyond the usual Oktoberfest emphasis on beer and food. Germanfest will focus on bringing a rich selection of activities, foods and drink and reflections of history into a family and kids friendly event.

This year, the GAI will be hosting the culture tent at GermanFest, where we’ll have kids crafts, trivia, a Glücksrad (prize wheel) and even a mini exhibit on the history of the GAI and the original Volksfest Association. Celebrate Friday night through Sunday afternoon—and you may even see some familiar faces from the Haus!

For more information, please visit the GermanFest Minnesota website.

 

History is full of assassinated leaders, but also full of near misses. Join us with Dr. Susanne Wagner, German Program Director at the University of St. Thomas, for a discussion focusing on the different types of Widerstand (resistance) and some of the more prominent resistance groups, such as the men involved in the July 20, 1944 failed attempt to assassinate Hitler, the Kreisauer Kreis (Kreisau Circle), the Rote Kapelle (the Red Orchestra), and the Weiße Rose (White Rose). What were the motivations of Widerstand fighters with Colonel Claus Graf von Stauffenberg, who planted the bomb that missed its mark? How do we evaluate Einsame Kämpfer (lonely fighters) such as Jägerstätter and George Elser, or the passive resistance of the members of the Weiße Rose and the Kreisauer Kreis?  Are the Swing Kids really Widerstand? The more extreme a regime, the more consequent the resistance against it! 

 

Wagner is a cultural and literary historian focusing on 19th-/20th century Germany with a research emphasis on resistance literature. In addition to heading the German Program at the University of St. Thomas, she is also a member of the Executive Council of the American Council of Teachers of German (AATG).

 

History is full of assassinated leaders, but also full of near misses. Join us with Dr. Susanne Wagner, German Program Director at the University of St. Thomas, for a discussion focusing on the different types of Widerstand (resistance) and some of the more prominent resistance groups, such as the men involved in the July 20, 1944 failed attempt to assassinate Hitler, the Kreisauer Kreis (Kreisau Circle), the Rote Kapelle (the Red Orchestra), and the Weiße Rose (White Rose). What were the motivations of Widerstand fighters with Colonel Claus Graf von Stauffenberg, who planted the bomb that missed its mark? How do we evaluate Einsame Kämpfer (lonely fighters) such as Jägerstätter and George Elser, or the passive resistance of the members of the Weiße Rose and the Kreisauer Kreis?  Are the Swing Kids really Widerstand? The more extreme a regime, the more consequent the resistance against it! 

 

Wagner is a cultural and literary historian focusing on 19th-/20th century Germany with a research emphasis on resistance literature. In addition to heading the German Program at the University of St. Thomas, she is also a member of the Executive Council of the American Council of Teachers of German (AATG).

 

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